Grants.original

“The new equipment (laser cutter, 3D printer, biodiesel processor) really lets us get involved with hands-on projects that Mr. Rainsberger has set for the engineering curriculum.  Thank you, Oakwood Schools Foundation, for giving us many more opportunities for hands-on learning!”– Ellie Hong, OHS 2013

Since 1991, The Oakwood Schools Foundation has awarded more than $700,000 in grants that have impacted every academic discipline and grade level in our district.  In addition to providing books, microscopes, iPads, laptops, a language lab, a mobile science lab and so much more in our classrooms, Foundation grants have also supported extracurricular activities, artists in residence, career education programs and professional development.

“Oakwood teachers bring so much knowledge and creativity to their classrooms, but the District budget can’t fund everything they’d like to do,” said Julie Cannon, Grants Chair for The Oakwood Schools Foundation.  “We applaud the vision of Oakwood’s teachers and administrators who submit these innovative grant ideas, and we thank our many generous donors who make it possible for The Foundation to fund initiatives that directly benefit Oakwood students.”

A 2012 grant funded new ceramics equipment for high school art. Students are creating magnificent pieces with the wheel, and conserving clay thanks to the new pug mill.

The OJHS/OHS Foreign Language Lab, funded by a grant from The Oakwood Schools Foundation, gives hundreds of foreign language students state-of-the-art tools for learning French and Spanish.

Elementary students love the iPad learning tools in many classrooms, provided by OSF grants.

Books!  Books!  Books!  OSF grants have provided books for students at every grade level.  Here. kindergarteners at Lange School select their favorite books from the shelves in the school’s fabulous library.

Lange kindergarteners know how to spell F-U-N:  playing with friends on the new playground equipment, provided in part by a grant from The Foundation.

Digital cameras, shared by art students at both Harman and Smith Elementary Schools, are giving students new ways to explore their creativity in the classroom and in the great outdoors.